Building up a bridge between home and school

I often refer to being on a journey as the author of this blog. I see myself as a lifelong learner, trying to connect my experiences as a parent, as a teacher, as a graduate student in math education. I feel like I am walking in the woods, enjoying the hike, wondering what the next curve may bring.  I pass the curve, and keep on going. Sometimes, I feel like I am getting lost. Sometimes, I reach a clearing, at the top of a hill, that gives me a better view of where I want to go.  Or a reminder of why I started the blog.

I read an article this week, discussing out-of-school learning vs school learning, and how often children do not connect the two of them (Saxe, 1984). It made me think of one of my first posts  : “For every single worksheet my children may bring from School, I want to make sure they know why they are learning these skills” (see post here). Indeed, whatever we do at home, I always try to connect it to Rosie’s or Tom’s school learning. But it might not be natural for everyone.

As you may have noticed with my lastest posts, I was quite inspired by the conference I attended to in June, on Cognitively Guided Instruction. One of the speakers, Tracy Zagger wrote recently a post for new math teachers (here), wanting them “to become addicted to listening to students’ mathematical ideas”. I am not a new math teacher, but it is definitely how I feel.  I think one of the reasons I am so attracted to the CGI approach is that it deeply echoes my vision of  seeing every child as a unique person and my belief that every child, in a supportive environment, can succeed. After the conference, I started following people on Twitter, exploring new blogs. Some are full of activities to implement in the classroom. Others bring math to the home, with discussions on the spot while cooking dinner, or buying groceries. Whether you browse the web as a parent or as a teacher, you can cross the paths of very inspiring people, and the resources are endless. But I see how a piece of the puzzle can easily be left aside, how the link that connects what is learned/done at school with what is learned/done at home can be forgotten.

I will continue my walk in the woods, I even expect reaching out into some deep dark woods as I begin to embrace my doctorate program tomorrow, but I know for sure that I want to keep focusing my effort on working on that bridge. Connecting both worlds can only take us even further.


Reference

  • Saxe, G. B.  (1988).  Candy selling and math learning.  Educational Researcher, 17(6), 14–21.

 


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